WUDC 2015: The Break, all the Results and Motions

Datum: Jan 1st, 2015
By
Category: international, Turniere

Team break

Out of the contingent of the Association of German Speaking University Debating Societies (VDCH) we are very happy to report the break of one team at this year’s Worlds in Malaysia! In the category “English as a foreign language” (EFL) the team Potsdam A (comprised of Mathias Hamann and Moritz Kirchner) broke in 4th place with 14 team points in total. The next round for them will be the EFL Semi Final on Friday, 2 January 2015. It will take place at 1 pm local time in Malaysia (which translates into 6 am local time in Germany) and will be streamed via Malaysia Worlds’ YouTube channel Malaysian Debaters TV. Their opponents will be Bauman A (Russia), Adam Mickiewicz A (Poland) and Seoul NUDA A (South Korea), the exact draw of the positions will be done right before the Semi Final starts.

logo_bannerAdditionally, in the category “English as a second language” (ESL) the team Berlin C (comprised of Christof Kebschull and Pegah Maham) got in 15th place with 15 team points in total. However, the team was not eligible for breaking because both speakers do not belong to the same debating society, which is required in the WUDC constitution. The team itself had asked the Chief adjudicators to be exempted from the break. This information got lost during the break night, causing some confusion around whether or not the team would compete during the outrounds.

Open Break
Princeton B, who tied for 48th with Pennsylvania A were on the exact same number of wins, speaker points, 1sts, 2nds, 3rds and 4ths after the preliminary rounds. This tie was resolved by a coin toss, as stated by the rules of the WUDC Council.
 
Ranking Team Name Team Points Speaker Points
1
Cambridge A
25
1522
2
Hart House A
22
1498
3
Harvard A
21
1501
4
BPP A
21
1493
5
Cambridge B
21
1490
6
Sydney D
21
1461
7
Melbourne A
20
1485
8
Oxford B
20
1473
9
Durham A
20
1471
10
IIUM A
20
1471
11
LSE A
20
1466
12
Vic Wellington A
20
1456
13
ANU A
20
1453
14
Auckland A
19
1484
15
Sydney A
19
1474
16
Sydney B
19
1471
17
Hart House B
19
1460
18
Canterbury A
19
1459
19
Brown A
19
1439
19
Columbia A
19
1439
21
Air Force A
19
1427
22
NUS C
19
1419
23
Glasgow A
19
1416
24
APU A
19
1405
25
Oxford A
18
1483
26
Sydney C
18
1473
27
Monash A
18
1466
28
Auckland B
18
1459
29
TCD-Phil A
18
1459
30
Oxford C
18
1455
30
Bates A
18
1455
32
Melbourne C
18
1454
33
McGill A
18
1450
34
Queens A
18
1447
35
Harvard C
18
1444
36
Otago A
18
1442
37
Bates B
18
1437
38
New South Wales B
18
1436
39
UBC A
18
1424
40
Hart House C
18
1424
41
Cape Town A
18
1422
42
IBADU A
18
1410
43
TCD-His B
18
1410
44
Stanford A
17
1460
45
Queensland A
17
1458
46
Belgrade A
17
1456
47
New South Wales A
17
1449
48
Pennsylvania A
17
1449
 
ESL Break
 
Ranking Team Name Total Score Speaker Points
Open Break
IIUM A
20
1471
Open Break
APU A
19
1405
Open Break
IBADU A
18
1410
Open Break
Belgrade A
17
1456
1
Gadjah Mada A
17
1385
2
CUHK A
16
1407
3
BFSU A
16
1394
4
Indonesia A
16
1391
5
Dhaka A
16
1388
6
Xavier A
16
1387
7
BRAC A
16
1385
8
UM B
16
1385
9
Keio A
16
1374
10
Seoul NUDA B
15
1410
11
Stockholm A
15
1406
12
IBADU C
15
1397
13
De La Salle A
15
1388
14
UM A
15
1386
15
ISA A
15
1375
16
IUT A
15
1368

EFL Break

Ranking Team Name Total Score Speaker Points
ESL Break
Gadjah Mada A
17
1385
ESL Break
BFSU A
16
1394
ESL Break
Keio A
16
1374
ESL Break
ISA A
15
1375
1
Bauman A
15
1354
2
Indonesia C
14
1361
3
MIPT A
14
1350
4
Potsdam A
14
1348
5
Adam Mickiewicz A
14
1348
6
Binus International A
13
1346
7
Nazarbayev A
13
1299
8
Seoul NUDA A
12
1373

Adjudicator break

Regarding judges the break ratio is a phenomenal five out of ten! Dessislava Kirova, John-Thomas Eltringham, Kai Dittmann, Patrick Ehmann as well as Rebecca Irvine (all Berlin or Independent Adjudicators) broke into the out rounds.

All the breaking adjudicators are listed here in alphabetical order:
 
Name Institution
Aaqib Hossain BRAC
Adam Buys Cornell
Adam Hawksbee Sheffield
Alfred Goh SMU
Amelia McLeod McGill
Andrea Bos Utrecht
Andrew Connery Yale
Anne Valkering Amsterdam
Anshul Kapoor NTU
Antony Paul Sydney
Arghya Dev Biswas Aryan BRAC
Arielle Dundas Utrecht
Arinah Najwa IIUM
Ben Adams Cambridge
Ben Dory Durham
Bionda Merckens Leiden
Brett Frazer Alaska
Brynne Guthrie Pretoria
Buzz Klinger HWS
Carlo Cabrera LSE
Charlie Morris Durham
Chuan-Zheng Lee Stanford
Clyde Welsh Sydney
Daniel Bregman Oxford
Daniel Kirkby UWA
Daniel Swain Sydney
Danique van Koppenhagen Utrecht
Dessislava Kirova Berlin
Dino De Leon DLSU
Dominic Guinane Monash
Duncan Crowe Glasgow
Elise Trewick Durham
Eliza Parer Queensland
Ellie Shearer Oxford
Ely Zosa Ateneo
Emil Mesaros Babes-Bolyai
Engin Arikan Galatasaray
Fred Cowell ULU
Gabriel Bowes-Whitton Sydney
Gavin Illsley Oxford
Gemma Buckley Monash
Georgie Bills Queensland
Glen Holm-Hansen Auckland
Griffin Olmstead Swarthmore
Harish Natarajan Cambridge
Henry Zhang Yale
Hyewon Rho Korea
Jack Davies Auckland
Jake Bustos UP Diliman
James Dixon Manchester
James Hardy Cambridge
Jamie Jackson Oxford
Jessica Musulin Griffith
John-Thomas Eltringham Berlin
Jonathan Kay LSE
Jonathan Leader-Maynard Oxford
Josh Taylor Griffith
Josh Zoffer Harvard
Joshua Park Solbridge
Justin Chan UNSW
Kai Dittman Berlin
Kanna Paramatheva APU
Karin Merckens Leiden
Katarina Schwarz Otago
Katie Heard Durham
Ken Newby Morehouse
Kimera Chetty KwaZulu Natal
Kip Oebanda Ateneo
Kira Dusterwald UCT
Lewis Iwu Oxford
Lindsay Bing Cornell
Lucian Tan Sydney
Madeline Schultz Monash
Manos Moschopoulos Athens
Megan Dickie Canterbury
Melissa Haller Colgate
Michael Barton Yale
Mikaela Brusasco Melbourne
Monica Ferris Hart House
Nick Cross Vic Wellington
Nikhil Puppala Monash
Patricia Johnson-Castle McGill
Patrick Ehmann Berlin
Prarthana Manohar NTU
Rebecca Irvine Monash
Rishada Cassim Melbourne
Rosie Unwin ULU
Sam Ward-Packard Yale
Sarah Balakrishnan Hart House
Sarah Mourney Sydney
Scott Ralston UCL
Seb Templeton Vic Wellington
Senna Maatoug Leiden
Shafiq Bazari UT Mara
Sharmila Parmanand Ateneo
Shira Almeleh Brandeis
Shyaam Raivadera Queensland
Simon Tunnicliffe Durham
Solange Handley Sydney
Souradip Sen IIT Bombay
Stephanie White Sydney
Stephen Garofano UNSW
Steve Johnson Alaska
Steve Penner HWS
Tarit Mukherjee UCL
Tasneem Elias IIUM
Tim Andrew APU
Tim Blair Melbourne
Tomas Beerthuis Utrecht
Vincent Chiang ANU
Xiao Hongyu NUS
Yi-An Shih NTU

We congratulate all speakers and judges on their excellent performances and hope to be able to be back with more good news on the team from Potsdam and the judges in the following days. Stay tuned and check our Twitter account regularly in order to be informed about the latest developments and the exact time of the EFL Semi Final on 2 January.

Women's Night in Malaysia with a debate on the motion "This House regrets the role of alcohol in social life." © 2014 Matthias Carcasona

Women’s Night in Malaysia with a debate on the motion “This House regrets the role of alcohol in social life.” © 2014 Matthias Carcasona

The motions

R1: This House regrets the decline of tightly integrated families.

R2: Infoslide: Climate engineering is a deliberate and large-scale intervention in earth’s climatic system in an effort to combat Global Warming. Climate engineering may take many forms; Examples include, but are not limited to, planting large forests where none previously existed, fertilizing the ocean with iron to dramatically increase the population of algae, and increasing cloud coverage so less sunlight reaches earth’s suface. This house believes that environmental movements should support climate engineering that fundamentally alters the environment, in an attempt to combat Global Warming.

R3: This House believes that in areas of socio-economic deprivation, schools should train students in vocational skills to the exclusion of the Liberal Arts.

R4: This House would prohibit the media from reporting on the mental illness of those accused of crimes.

R5: This House belives that the international community should cut off internet access in Syria.

R6: This House belives that developing countries should adopt economic development policies that heavily disincentivise urbanisation.

R7: Infoslide: Over the last decade, scientists have identified a range of chemicals that exist naturally in the brain and shape individuals’ moral behaviour. Significant amounts of research is now being carried out to create “moral enhancement drugs”, which would alter the levels of such chemicals. Such drugs have been shown to increase individuals’ tendencies to display empathy and care for others, to behave in altruistic way, and to resist pressures to act in ways that violate their personal ethical beliefs. This House would ban the research and production of moral enhancement drugs.

R8: This House believes that the United States and the European Union should seek to promote peace by heavily subsidising Israeli businesses who invest in the Palestinian territories.

R9: This House, as a medical professional employed by the United States military or security services, would, and would encourage others, to refuse orders to provide medical treatment to individuals undergoing “Enhanced Interrogation Techniques”.

Public speaking break

The following participants suceeded in the public speaking competition:

Name
April Broadbent
Charles Frost
Darrel Chingaramde
Hassann bin Shaheen
Howard Cohen
Joe McGrade
Moustafa Elbaadwihi
Natalie Wang
Nathan Kohler
Obiyo Daniel
Samuel Muleya

Teresa Widlok/ama/hug – last update on January 5, 2015, 8 pm

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Schlagworte: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

20 Kommentare zu “WUDC 2015: The Break, all the Results and Motions”

  1. niels berlin says:

    What is the interpretation of the vdch of the wudc constitution?

  2. Robert aus Potsdam says:

    Ja, warum durfte Berlin jetzt nicht reden?

  3. Konrad Gütschow says:

    Der vdch hat beschlossen, dass Pegah nicht Berlinerin ist. Damit ist Berlin C ein mixed Team und daher nicht breakberechtigt.
    Anscheinend klärt das in unklaren Fällen der jeweilige Dachverband und die WUDC übernehmen dann den Besclhuss.

  4. Niels berlin says:

    vielleicht sollte sich der VDCH in einer Debattier-Welt, in der ein höchst dubioses BPP Team die Euros gewinnt und ULU und die Iren machen was sie wollen, sich noch einmal überlegen, wie sie elegibility Regeln in Zukunft auslegen wollen. Und darüber hinaus: Mit welcher Legitimität entscheidet der VDCH in dieser Sache überhaupt irgendetwas? Sollte das nicht der German-Caucus entscheiden?

  5. Toni (München) says:

    Nur mal so interessehalber: Wer ist in diesem Fall eigentlich “der VDCH”?

  6. Christian (MZ) says:

    Der VDCH ist ein eingetragener Verein und damit eine juristische Person, die von ihrem Vorstand vertreten wird. Ob der “German Caucus” irgendeine Rechtspersönlichkeit hat, weiß ich nicht, denn ich bin kein Kenner der internationalen Debattierszene. Ebenso wenig weiß ich, wer Deutschland (oder auch Österreich und die Schweiz) gegenüber den Ausrichtern vertritt und ob es da überhaupt eine zwischen die Universitäten/Clubs und die Ausrichter zwischen geschaltete Instanz gibt. In jedem Fall wäre es vermutlich gut, wenn man für die Zukunft eine eindeutige Regelung findet, nach welchen Kriterien eine solche Entscheidung von wem getroffen wird.
    Allerdings meine ich auch schon gehört zu haben, dass Mixed Teams bei internationalen Turnieren grundsätzlich verboten sind. Wenn andere gegen diese Regeln verstoßen, ist das natürlich bedauerlich und auch unfair gegenüber ehrlichen Teams. Aber ob man dann selbst auch gegen die Regelung verstoßen soll, wäre wohl Gegenstand für eine eigene Debatte. In jedem Fall könnte man für die Zukunft anregen, die aktuell geltende strenge Mixed Team Regelung abzuschaffen oder abzuwandeln, wenn man damit oder der laufenden Praxis nicht zufrieden ist.

  7. Michael S says:

    An Christian(MZ):
    “In jedem Fall könnte man für die Zukunft anregen, die aktuell geltende strenge Mixed Team Regelung abzuschaffen oder abzuwandeln, wenn man damit oder der laufenden Praxis nicht zufrieden ist.”
    Die WM ist keine gut geölte Maschine, die einfach funktioniert.

    Die eigene Vergangenheit des VDCH zeigt, dass Mixed Teams oft akzeptiert wurden, weil gerade in der deutschen Szene sich oft Uni- und Clubzugehörigkeit unterscheiden. Manche unserer Vorzeigeteams bei der WM aus der jüngeren Vergangenheit hätten bei dieser Auslegung nicht antreten dürfen.
    Wo auf einmal der Drang zu Law&Order (§§§) herkommt, ist für mich schwer nachvollziehbar. Zumal es keine vorherige Diskussion im VDCH gab.

    Was soll jetzt geschehen? Soll der VDCH die vergangenen Worlds und Euros durchgehen und schauen, ob alles “korrekt” ablief? Müssen Unregelmäßigkeiten gemeldet werden? Soll ein “falsches” Break nachträglich entzogen werden? Oder hat Berlin C dieses Jahr einfach Pech gehabt, dass die “Falschen” das Sagen hatten?
    Ich kann das Gefühl nicht abschütteln, dass hier überhastet entschieden wurde.

    In jedem Fall tut es mir sehr leid, dass Berlin C nicht reden durfte. Solche Gelegenheiten tauchen manchmal nur einmal im Leben auf.

  8. Tobias Kube says:

    Bevor hier zu viel Spekulatives diskutiert wird: Es ist nicht so, dass irgendwer Berlin C verboten hätte zu breaken. Es war viel mehr so, dass mich Pegah am 29.12. gefragt hat (unter Schilderung ihrer Aktivitäten für die BDU), wie meine Einschätzung der Lage wäre und bat hierbei um schnellstmögliche Antwort, um es an die CAs weiterzuleiten. Unter Hinweis auf die angesichts der kurzen Zeit begrenzten Möglichkeiten, die Frage erschöpfend zu untersuchen habe ich ihr geantwortet, dass sie nach meiner ad hoc Einschätzung aus VDCH-Sicht gern breaken dürfen. Zwei Tage hat mir Pegah dann mitgeteilt, dass sie und Christof sich nach etwas Überlegung dann SELBST dafür entschieden haben, nicht breaken zu wollen.

  9. Andreas Lazar says:

    Am 31.?? Obwohl sie in den zwei Tagen zuvor schon 10 Punkte gesammelt hatten und damit absehen konnten, dass sie eine gute Chance hatten, in ESL zu breaken (keine kleine Leistung!), und obwohl sie Tobis Plazet hatten, haben sich Pegah und Christof dann kurz vor knapp entschieden, doch nicht breaken zu wollen? Vielleicht können sie mir ihre Entscheidung mal selbst erläutern, ich verstehe sie nämlich nicht.

  10. Konrad Gütschow says:

    Bisher haben sie deutsche Teams aber an die deutsche Primärclubregel gehalten, oder?
    Was war an dem BPP Team und an den Iren komisch Niels? Bin in der Szene leider nicht genug drin um Namen zu kennen und selbst zuzuordnen.

  11. Manuel A. says:

    Wer sich (am besten ohne konkrete Fälle namentlich und öffentlich zu diskutieren) mit WUDC Eligibility befassen möchte, kann beispielsweise die Zusammenfassung lesen, die wir für unsere eigene Weltmeisterschaft zusammen mit dem damaligen Chair des WUDC Council erstellt haben: http://berlinworlds.blogspot.it/2012/02/wudc-eligibility.html

    Und nein, es obliegt nicht den nationalen Verbänden, die Constitution für ihre jeweils eigenen Leute auszulegen. Zweifelsfälle sind mit Council (bzw. dessen Chair) zu erörtern.

    Ich meine, dass darüber hinaus beschlossen worden ist, dass der Ausrichter die Eligibility jedes Teilnehmers vor Beginn der ersten Runde zu prüfen hat. Das ist allerdings bislang nicht implementiert. Daher kann man in der Praxis in den Vorrunden noch leicht mogeln, während man das in den Finalrunden unbedingt vermeiden sollten. Insbesondere als Club, der ein gewisses internationale Renommee zu verlieren hat.

  12. Konrad Gütschow says:

    Am Ende steht dann aber doch: “Should questions of eligibility arise, the Constitution of the World Universities Debating Council directs the tournament organizers to consult the representative national debating body of the appropriate country.”
    Von dem her kann das OrgCom/CAP das ganze an den vdch abschieben, bzw den vdch anfragen.

  13. Daniil says:

    Also ich war auch enttäuscht, zu sehen, dass Pegah und Christof nicht breaken durften und emotional zunächs voll bei Micha, Niels und Andreas. Ich muss allerdings sagen: In dem von Manuel provideten Link ist es recht eindeutig, dass man an der Uni eingeschrieben sein muss, die man repräsentiert. Und da sehe ich keinen Spielraum für Interpretation.

    Ich halte persönlich schon seit Beginn meiner Debattierhistorie jede Regelung für absurd, die Breakfähigkeit an die Zugehörigkeit zu Universitäten bindet und plädiere dafür, Clubzugehörigkeiten als Kriterium zu nehmen (unabhängig davon, dass dies ein deutlich schwammigeres und insofern teilweise nicht zu kontrollierendes Kriterium ist). Solange wir allerdings (übrigens auch im deutschsprachigen Debattieren) suboptimale Regelungen haben, die wir selbst (respektive die von uns gewählten Clubvertreter) aufstellen, sollten wir uns schon dran halten. Der Fairness halber.

    Völlig unabhängig davon Applaus für Berlin C – maybe next time..

  14. niels berlin says:

    Über ein Bier Konrad, jetzt ist es eh zu spät…. 😉

  15. Mathias Pdm says:

    Bei ISA A aus Moskau war es auch so, die sind aus dem ESL-Break rausgeflogen und für die ist dann Baumann A aus Moskau aus dem EFL-Break nachgerückt. Die waren dann auch das nächste Team im ESL-Ranking.

  16. Daniil says:

    P.S: Ich wurde gestern Abend per Link zur VDCH-Beschlusssammlung darauf hingewiesen, dass im deutschsprachigen Debattieren seit der letzten MV tatsächlich nur noch die Club-Regel gilt. Ich möchte daher meinen Post in dem Sinne korrigieren, dass wir hier bei uns eine hervorragende Regelung haben. 😉

  17. Jörn(Duisburg) says:

    @Text: Ich finde, dass es sinnvoll und wichtig ist, dass der obige Text überprüft und ggf. dem in den Kommentaren dargelegten Sachverhalt angepasst wird.

    @Pegah + u.a.: Glückwunsch zur guten Turnierleistung!

    @Debatte: Die Regelung zur Teilnahme, um die es hier in der Diskussion geht, sind doch eigentlich einer Debatte auf Turnierniveau nicht würdig: In der von Manuel verlinkten “Klarstellung” (vorletzter Absatz) wird grundsätzlich eine bijektive Abbildung von Universität und Klub verlangt, die aber schon gleich wieder dadurch eingeschränkt wird, dass es Ausnahmen geben könnte, wenn sich diese Bijektivität traditionell nicht ergeben hat. Beispielhaft: Dürfte man den Studierenden der Jacobs U. in Bremen die Teilnahme für die HDU verbieten, denn an der Jacobs U. gibt es bereits länger einen eigenen Debattierklub als die HDU existiert, oder existiert die HDU mittlerweile mit ausreichender Tradition, dass dies unter eine Ausnahme fällt?
    Worin besteht überhaupt der Sinn der Regelungen? Obwohl eigentlich bei allen vernünftig reglementierten internationalen Turnieren, die zwischen Verbänden ausgetragen werden, Verbände darüber entscheiden, wer sie repräsentiert, melden sich hier einzelne Klubs bzw. genauer Teams selbst an. Einige Klubs sind mit mehreren Teams vertreten, die meisten Klubs der Verbände mit gar keinem Team. Es ist daher schon strittig, ob überhaupt die einzelnen Universitäten bzw. Klubs repräsentiert werden, die Verbände werden aber in jedem Fall nicht repräsentiert.
    Es geht also – und das wahrscheinlich wirklich traditionell – um ein Messen zwischen Universitäten oder Klubs. Wahrscheinlich – das lässt sich aus den obigen Ausnahmen (mehrere Universitäten speisen gemeinsam einen Klub) ableiten – um das Messen zwischen Klubs, und zwar in diesem Fall über die Landesgrenzen hinaus. Dies erscheint mir auch vernünftig, denn die wesentliche Arbeit zur Nachwuchsförderung (und die tolle Verbandsarbeit ist mir mit all den Maßnahmen nicht fremd) wird in den Klubs geleistet.

    Gleichzeitig stellt sich aber schon die Frage, wieso man sich bei dem Gedanken, dass die Nachwuchsförderung hauptsächlich eine Aufgabe der Klubs ist, mit diesen wenig konsequenten Regelungen tatsächlich einer natürlichen Gesetzgebung verschreibt: Als natürliche Gesetzgebung bezeichne ich den Umstand, dass man nur für den Klub antreten darf, dem man durch seine Wahl des Studienorts qua “göttlicher Fügen” zugedacht ist, und man nur mit denen antreten darf, die ebenfalls durch die Wahl ihres Studienorts einem an die Seite gestellt wurden. Eine Wahl des Klubs ist ja nur denjenigen möglich, die an Universitäten studieren, an denen es mehrere Klubs gibt. Das ist traditionell in Deutschland z.B. nicht der Fall. Darüber hinaus ist die Debattierszene in deutschsprachigen Staaten insgesamt auch nicht so breit, dass es tatsächlich an jedem Hochschulstandort möglich ist, ein entsprechendes Team aufzubauen. Auch wenn Klubs wichtige und gute Arbeit leisten, Entscheidendes entzieht sich auch ihrem Verantwortungsbereich. Im Moment bleiben viele gute Redende von der teilnahme ausgeschlossen, weil sie zurfalschen zeit an der falschen Hochschule studieren. Der VDCH sollte sich also dafür einsetzen, dass man zu anderen – eindeutigeren – freieren Regelungen bei den WUDC kommt!

    // Nach Rücksprache mit der Autorin haben wir den Text nun angepasst. ama

  18. Barbara (HH) says:

    Ich denke, was wir alle aus dieser Sache lernen sollten, ist, die Breakberechtigung eines Teams stets schon vor Turnierbeginn durch die zuständigen Stellen verbindlich klären zu lassen. Ich muss auch sagen – natürlich als vollkommen Außenstehende – dass ich nicht wirklich verstehe, warum es (gerade bei so einem doch alles andere als schwach einzuschätzenden Team) überhaupt zu dieser hektischen Situation kommen konnte und dies nicht vorher für den Fall der Fälle durch den meldenden Club geklärt wurde.

    Anders als z.B. Andreas weiter oben kann ich mir auch sehr gut vorstellen, warum man sich als Redner in einer solchen Situation gegen einen Break entscheidet und ich würde sogar soweit gehen zu sagen, dass es für die Redner unzumutbar ist, diese Entscheidung in so kurzer Zeit vor Ort selbst treffen zu müssen. Ein nichtberechtigter Break verwehrt einem anderen Team die (dann berechtigte!) Chance, selbst in dem Viertelfinale zu reden und wäre damit zutiefst unsportlich. Zudem kann dies einen erheblichen Imageschaden für den meldenden Club bedeuten. Gerade bei den “Mixed”-Teams, wo diese Frage ja nur wirklich relevant werden dürfte, ist dies besonders pikant, da wenigstens einer der Redner sich gleichsam als “Gast” in diesem Team befindet und damit dem gastgebenden Club den überlassenen Startplatz möglicherweise mit dem Imageschaden dankt. Der Schaden beträfe damit potentiell viele, während die Nutzung des Breaks vor allem dem eigenen Spaß und dem eigenen Ehrgeiz dienen würde. Daher hoffe ich wirklich, dass in Zukunft diese Entscheidung vorab in Ruhe durch die zuständigen Stellen getroffen wird und nicht in der Hektik und dem Trubel eines Turniers.

    Davon abgesehen: Meinen herzlichsten Glückwunsch an Pegah und Christof für die großartigen Leistungen, ebenso natürlich an die gebreakten Potsdamer und die erfolgreichen Juroren!

    Vor allem aber meinen uneingeschränkten Respekt für die gezeigte Sportlichkeit, trotz einer positiven ad-hoc Einschätzung durch den VDCH Präsidenten, einer unklaren Rechtslage und scheinbar früheren zweifelhaften Breaks anderer Teams dem Zweifel den Vorrang zu geben und auf diese Chance, im ESL-Viertelfinale der WUDC zu reden, zu verzichten!

  19. Pegah (B.) says:

    Tobis Darstellung ist die korrekte. Es tut mir sehr leid, dass es zu einem Missverständnis kam. Abgesehen davon ist es ganz allgemein unfair und undankbar, wenn wir alle gemeinsam auf der MV eine eher “schwammige” Regelung beschließen, was die Clubzugehörigkeit angeht und dann Tobi anfahren, wenn er diese auslegen soll und sich seine Sicht nicht mit unserer deckt. Er macht seine Arbeit als VDCH-Präsident mehr als vorbildlich.

    Alles Weitere wurde hier bereits hinreichend diskutiert. Insbesondere Barbaras Kommentar möchte ich zustimmen. Sich frühzeitig mit diesen Fragen gründlich zu beschäftigen, ist ein guter Ratschlag für alle zukünftigen Teams.

  20. Hello, I think your site might be having browser compatibility issues.
    When I look at your website in Firefox, it looks fine but when opening in Internet Explorer, it has
    some overlapping. I just wanted to give you
    a quick heads up! Other then that, fantastic blog!

Comments are closed.

Follow Achte Minute





RSS Feed Posts, RSS Feed Comments
Help for mobile version

Credits

Powered by WordPress.

Our Sponsors

Hauptsponsor
Medienpartner